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I Can No Longer Sit By As Brexit Jeopardises My Generation's Future

I Can No Longer Sit By As Brexit Jeopardises My Generation’s Future

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Australia Brasil Canada Deutschland España France Ελλάδα (Greece) India Italia 日本 (Japan) 한국 (Korea) Maghreb México Québec (en français) South Africa United Kingdom United States THE BLOG 20/03/2019 08:49 GMT | Updated 15 hours ago I Can No Longer Sit By As Brexit Jeopardises My Generation’s Future For the first time I find myself afraid for my future – and when you’re scared you can either run away or you can fight for what you believe 321 Daniel Taylor Young activist Sam Mellish via Getty Images I can no longer sit and do nothing. Though I’ve voted in every election that I’ve been able to, until very recently I’ve been quite content to keep politics at arm’s length. Our political system has always seemed beyond my reach. Politicians don’t target young people, and so young people are less engaged. And the cycle repeats.
Brexit has changed everything. For the first time I find myself afraid for my future. I see it as so much more than a simple sequence of events. I see my future, and the futures of my friends, family, and country as interlinked – not isolated. I see our futures as part of something bigger. When you are faced with something that scares you, there are two choices; you can run away and hide, or you can stand and fight for what you believe in.
I didn’t expect the country to vote to leave the EU. Almost no-one did. I understand and accept that most leave supporters voted with good, honest intentions; with the genuine belief that their decision would be best for the UK. However, I struggle to believe that everyone who voted to leave knew exactly what they wanted out of Brexit. I’m even more sceptical that they all believed in the same Brexit.
During the campaign we were told that we could follow the Norwegian model, the Swiss model , or some form of the Canada+ model . We were told that we could remain in the single market. We were told that we could spend an additional £350million per week on the NHS. Yet the reality of Brexit, after two years of negotiations with the EU, looks completely different. The deal agreed by Theresa May actively leaves the UK with less control, no extra money for the NHS, and a Northern Irish backstop that wasn’t even mentioned during the campaign.
Theresa May’s deal doesn’t deliver upon what was promised. But broken promises notwithstanding, there is no other deal on the table: this is the best we’ve got. In such a case, with Brexit having far reaching and long-lasting consequences, the British people should be consulted, to ensure they still believe that leaving the EU is the best course for the country. A People’s Vote, by its very nature, cannot be undemocratic. This would not be a case of rerunning the first referendum (and the country agrees on this), but an opportunity to vote between two absolutes: we either leave with the PM’s deal, or we retain our current benefits as a member of the EU.
The events of the last week further cemented the need for a new referendum. Whilst a People’s Vote has been voted down in the first instance, there is no way to resolve Brexit without it. The Prime Minister’s deal commands no majority in parliament, No Deal has been roundly rejected, and there is no consensus for any alternative deal – despite repeated claims from the Labour front bench. Bercow’s statement on Monday made clear that there would be no further votes on this deal without substantive changes being made to it. These show no signs of appearing, leaving us hurtling towards the 29th with no deal, and no plan for getting one. We are, once more, in gridlock. Quite simply, if parliament cannot arrive at a decision, the only responsible way forward is to put it to the people. A People’s Vote represents not a Brexit option, but a solution.
I hope that leave voters can recognise and appreciate this position. We know so much more now than in 2016, not only about our country, but about the problems that we are going to face in the coming years, such as climate change, antibiotic resistance, and rising inequality. These will not be limited by geography. We need to work more closely with the global community, not isolate ourselves in the North Sea, falling back on trade deals with Switzerland and the Faroe Islands.
The future is concerning: but for the first time it is exciting to have found a cause that has truly engaged me with politics. Similarly, all over the country, other young people are going through the same thought processes and arriving at the same conclusions. We have been underrepresented for too long, but things are changing. We are on the television, we are in newspapers, we are all over the internet. We are being heard.
I was one of the 700,000 people who marched through London in October. I have travelled down to Parliament to lobby my MP with Our Future, Our Choice. I will be marching again this Saturday. I can no longer sit and do nothing, and neither can the millions of other young people. This is our future – will you fight for it?
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Hockey night in Cree: announcers prepare for historic NHL broadcast News

When the Carolina Hurricanes host the Montreal Canadiens this weekend, the NHL game will be called in the Plains Cree language, a historic first in broadcasting.
Sportsnet and the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) say it will be the first NHL game ever aired in a Cree language.
“It’s a big deal for many, including myself,” play-by-play announcer Clarence Iron told CBC Edmonton’s Radio Active this week.
Hockey history will be made this Sunday. For the first time ever, an NHL game will be broadcast in Cree. Play-by-play announcer Clarence Iron talks about what it means to him to broadcast the game in his own language. 8:13 Live coverage of the Hurricanes-Canadiens contest will air Sunday on APTN at 7 p.m. ET / 4 p.m. PT.
The broadcast will take place in conjunction with the Rogers Hometown Hockey festival, which is making a stop this weekend at Enoch Cree Nation on Edmonton’s western boundary.
Habs, Canes to play in historic Plains Cree language broadcast of NHL game Iron, who lives in Pinehouse, Sask., will be joined by studio host Earl Wood and retired NHL player John Chabot, who will provide commentary and analysis.
“A lot of Cree-speaking people told me, ‘You should one day maybe call a game in the NHL in Cree,'” Iron said. “Now it’s going to happen.”
Decades of experience prepared Iron for the role. He’s a host at the northern Saskatchewan radio station CFNK. He has called many Indigenous hockey tournaments over the years and sometimes dabbles in play-by-play Cree during local games.
Clarence Iron hosts in his Plains Cree language on the Pinehouse, Sask., radio station CFNK 89.9 FM. He’ll be calling play-by-play on the APTN broadcast of the NHL game Sunday evening. (Clarence Iron/ Facebook) Iron worked in radio for 20 years, then retired and worked in northern Saskachewan mines for about 10 years before returning to broadcasting at CFNK. He said he doesn’t feel nervous stepping into the role for APTN.
“My language, I think, is really up to par, because that’s what we carry out here: our Cree language,” he said. “So the Cree will be no problem. It’s just trying to remember the names and the numbers — and, you know, I think I got it.”
Wood, from Saddle Lake, Alta., is a member of Grammy-nominated group Northern Cree. He said he hopes the hockey broadcast will inspire young viewers.
“I feel like it’s going to be a wonderful catalyst for our young people,” Wood said, “to ignite, and to invigorate and to enhance the beauty of the language, which helps us identify our authentic selves as Indigenous people and the world view that comes from.”
Next generation of Indigenous hockey players aims to break down stereotypes, inspire others Chabot said he believes there will be more television broadcasts in Cree and in other Indigenous languages.
“We want to use this as an opening to something further and having it every week,” he said.
“Right now it’s going to be hockey — it’s going to be something that interests a lot of communities, and we want to see it used going forward.”
Wood said he’ll be thinking about his grandchildren while he’s on the air, as well as the grandparents who will be watching.
“Everybody who has ever played hockey in Indian territory and everybody who has ever spoken that beautiful vibratory language of Cree has had a hand in where it’s come to now.”

Hockey night in Cree: announcers prepare for historic NHL broadcast

When the Carolina Hurricanes host the Montreal Canadiens this weekend, the NHL game will be called in the Plains Cree language, a historic first in broadcasting.
Sportsnet and the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) say it will be the first NHL game ever aired in a Cree language.
“It’s a big deal for many, including myself,” play-by-play announcer Clarence Iron told CBC Edmonton’s Radio Active this week.
Hockey history will be made this Sunday. For the first time ever, an NHL game will be broadcast in Cree. Play-by-play announcer Clarence Iron talks about what it means to him to broadcast the game in his own language. 8:13 Live coverage of the Hurricanes-Canadiens contest will air Sunday on APTN at 7 p.m. ET / 4 p.m. PT.
The broadcast will take place in conjunction with the Rogers Hometown Hockey festival, which is making a stop this weekend at Enoch Cree Nation on Edmonton’s western boundary.
Habs, Canes to play in historic Plains Cree language broadcast of NHL game Iron, who lives in Pinehouse, Sask., will be joined by studio host Earl Wood and retired NHL player John Chabot, who will provide commentary and analysis.
“A lot of Cree-speaking people told me, ‘You should one day maybe call a game in the NHL in Cree,'” Iron said. “Now it’s going to happen.”
Decades of experience prepared Iron for the role. He’s a host at the northern Saskatchewan radio station CFNK. He has called many Indigenous hockey tournaments over the years and sometimes dabbles in play-by-play Cree during local games.
Clarence Iron hosts in his Plains Cree language on the Pinehouse, Sask., radio station CFNK 89.9 FM. He’ll be calling play-by-play on the APTN broadcast of the NHL game Sunday evening. (Clarence Iron/ Facebook) Iron worked in radio for 20 years, then retired and worked in northern Saskachewan mines for about 10 years before returning to broadcasting at CFNK. He said he doesn’t feel nervous stepping into the role for APTN.
“My language, I think, is really up to par, because that’s what we carry out here: our Cree language,” he said. “So the Cree will be no problem. It’s just trying to remember the names and the numbers — and, you know, I think I got it.”
Wood, from Saddle Lake, Alta., is a member of Grammy-nominated group Northern Cree. He said he hopes the hockey broadcast will inspire young viewers.
“I feel like it’s going to be a wonderful catalyst for our young people,” Wood said, “to ignite, and to invigorate and to enhance the beauty of the language, which helps us identify our authentic selves as Indigenous people and the world view that comes from.”
Next generation of Indigenous hockey players aims to break down stereotypes, inspire others Chabot said he believes there will be more television broadcasts in Cree and in other Indigenous languages.
“We want to use this as an opening to something further and having it every week,” he said.
“Right now it’s going to be hockey — it’s going to be something that interests a lot of communities, and we want to see it used going forward.”
Wood said he’ll be thinking about his grandchildren while he’s on the air, as well as the grandparents who will be watching.
“Everybody who has ever played hockey in Indian territory and everybody who has ever spoken that beautiful vibratory language of Cree has had a hand in where it’s come to now.”

15 major movie franchises that Disney owns after buying Fox, from ‘Avatar’ to ‘X-Men’

“X-Men: Days of Future Past” Fox The Disney-Fox deal closed on Wednesday, meaning Disney now owns Fox’s film studio and many of its television assets. Disney is already dominant over the box office with the Marvel Cinematic Universe and “Star Wars” movies, and now owns popular Fox movie franchises like “X-Men” and “Avatar.” Disney’s reign over Hollywood isn’t going to slow down any time soon. The Disney-Fox merger officially closed on Wednesday, meaning Disney now owns Fox’s film studio and many of its television assets. Disney bought Fox last year in a massive $71 billion deal. READ MORE : Meet the power players of the Disney-Fox merger, who will lead its iconic franchises into the future and do battle with Netflix The Mouse House ruled the box office in 2019 with “Avengers: Infinity War,” “Black Panther,” and “Incredibles 2.” Now, Disney is in possession of even more popular movie franchises to cement its place as the box-office ruler for years to come. Disney’s already-dominant collection of assets has raked in billions of dollars for the company under CEO Bob Iger’s leadership. They include some of the most popular, highest-grossing film franchises of all time, such as the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Pixar’s animated movies, and the “Star Wars” series. Below are 14 major film franchises that Disney now owns: 1 / Disney Animation Disney Disney built itself on classic hand-drawn Disney fairy tales like “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” and “Cinderella.” In recent years, Disney Animation has seen a revival in popular CGI-animated movies like “Zootopia,” “Frozen,” and “Moana.” Later this year, “Frozen 2” hits theaters. After John Lasseter’s exit, Jennifer Lee is in charge of Disney Animation Studios. Lasseter his role as Chief Creative Officer last year (in which he oversaw both Disney and Pixar Animation Studios) after being accused of sexual harassment and admitting to “missteps.” Lee has directed “Frozen” and its upcoming sequel. 2 / Live-action remakes Disney Disney discovered with 2014’s “Maleficent” and 2015’s “Cinderella” that remaking its classic animated movies could result in big box-office numbers. Since then, “The Jungle Book” and “Beauty and the Beast” have gotten the live-action treatment and raked in huge sums of money. This year, Disney will release remakes of “Dumbo,” “Aladdin,” and “The Lion King.” 3 / Pixar Disney/Pixar Disney bought animation studio Pixar in 2006 in one of Bob Iger’s very first major acquisitions as CEO. Since then, two Pixar movies — “Toy Story 3” and “Up” — have been nominated for best picture Oscars. While the studio has been relying more frequently on sequels rather than original ideas in recent years, its movies are still highly successful. Last summer’s “Incredibles 2” has made over $1 billion worldwide. 4 / Marvel Cinematic Universe Marvel Studios Disney bought Marvel Entertainment, including its film studio, in 2009, and since then the Marvel Cinematic Universe has become the highest-grossing franchise of all time. Last year’s “Avengers: Infinity War” crossed $2 billion worldwide, and “Captain Marvel” is currently on its way to break $1 billion. The “Infinity War” sequel, “Avengers: Endgame,” is expected to break even more box-office records this year when it comes out in April. 5 / Indiana Jones LucasFilm Disney bought Lucasfilm in 2012, and with it came the “Indiana Jones” franchise. The fifth film was pushed back from 2020 to 2021. 6 / “Star Wars” Lucasfilm “Star Wars” obviously also came with Lucasfilm. Since the acquisition, Disney has released four “Star Wars” movies (one every year since 2015): two as part of a new trilogy in the main saga, and two spin-off movies. The first three were big box-office success stories and crossed $1 billion worldwide, but “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” which was released in May, was a box-office disappointment. “Episode IX” comes to theaters in December. 7 / Post-Fox: Alien/Predator 20th Century Fox The “Alien” and “Predator” franchises’ R-ratings don’t necessarily fit the Disney brand, so it remains to be seen what will become of the movies. However, Disney CEO Bob Iger has expressed that mature Fox movies would still be made under Disney, but they would have be branded correctly to avoid confusion for audiences . “The Predator,” directed by Shane Black, was released last year to little enthusiasm. The future of the “Alien” franchise has been in limbo since Ridley Scott’s “Alien: Covenant” disappointed at the box office in 2017. 8 / Avatar 20th Century Fox “Avatar” remains the highest-grossing movie of all time, and director James Cameron has planned to release four sequels between 2020 and 2025. 9 / “Deadpool” 20th Century Fox The two “Deadpool” movies, about the self-aware mutant mercenary, made $1.5 billion worldwide combined. An spin-off movie called “X-Force” was in development with director Drew Goddard, but it’s in limbo. Disney CEO Bob Iger said last month that Disney would be open to R-rated movies like “Deadpool” if they were branded well. 10 / Die Hard 20th Century Fox It’s been six years since the last in the series, “A Good Day to Die Hard,” which has an atrocious 14% critic score on Rotten Tomatoes and disappointed at the box office. 11 / Fantastic Four Fox 2015’s “Fantastic Four” reboot tanked with audiences and critics, receiving a 9% critic score on Rotten Tomatoes and just $56 million at the US box office. The characters could fit nicely into the MCU — if Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige is willing to take that chance. Disney’s upcoming streaming platform, Disney+, is always an option. 12 / Ice Age 20th Century Fox “Ice Age” has been a successful animated franchise for Fox. While they’ve dipped in quality across the five movies, they’ve done well at the worldwide box office. The fourth movie, “Continental Drift,” grossed over $870 million globally. 13 / Kingsman 20th Century Fox Like other Fox franchises, the mature themes and violence of the “Kingsman” series would have a difficult time fitting in at Disney, but director Matthew Vaughn has plans for a third installment. 14 / Planet of the Apes Fox The “Planet of the Apes” prequel trilogy wrapped up last year with “War for the Planet of the Apes” to widespread critical acclaim. 15 / X-Men/Deadpool Fox Fox’s biggest film franchise, the “X-Men” movies, have managed to maintain a steady success rate for nearly two decades. There are a lot of story possibilities that the Marvel Cinematic Universe could take advantage of if it introduces a new version of the X-Men characters, but we’ll have to wait and see what Disney has planned. “Dark Phoenix” comes to theaters in June and could be the final “X-Men” movie made pre-Disney to be released. An “X-Men” spin-off, “The New Mutants,” is supposed to arrive in August, but questions have been raised about whether the movie will actually be released to theaters. The Hollywood Reporter reported earlier this month that movie appears to be in limbo after a troubled production, just five months before its scheduled release.

Model with Down syndrome breaks stereotypes…

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The lunchroom can get a little rowdy when the kindergarten through second-grade classes fill up the tables. Grace Strobel scans the room for little hands waving in the air. She spots a group of kids who frequently call for her to help open their condiment packets or juice boxes and walks over.
Linda Strobel was closer to the table and checked in on the group.
“Can I help you?” she said.
“No, we want her to help us,” a boy said, pointing at Grace. Linda asked why.
“Because we know she can’t do it,” he said, while the kids around him burst into laughter.
Grace, then 20, heard the entire exchange and burst into tears. Linda told her to walk away and calm herself. Then Linda turned to the children, who had no idea that she was Grace’s mom.
“Guys, would you laugh at someone in a wheelchair?” They shook their heads. Grace isn’t physically disabled.
Grace Strobel, (center), goes over the symptoms of scurvy with her mother, Linda on Sunday, March 10, 2019, as she does homework at their Wildwood home. Photo by Christian Gooden, Christian Gooden • cgooden@post-dispatch.com
“What Grace is doing is really hard for her. She’s trying to help you. But what you are doing is kind of like laughing at someone in a wheelchair,” she explained. The children, some as old as 8 years old, seemed chastened.
Grace, who had worked as a volunteer in the lunchroom for about six months that school year, was inconsolable. She cried the entire way to their home in Wildwood. She’s an irrepressibly cheerful and positive young woman, but this moment hit her hard. She cried for four days.
Linda had never seen her daughter like this. There had been times growing up when classmates made mean remarks or strangers stared at her. But under the wing of her protective younger sister and parents, Grace always shook it off. But this was her job. Where she was supposed to be in charge. Where she tried to help these children. Their laughter cut into the core of her self-esteem. For the first time ever, she seemed defeated.
Grace said she felt sad and scared and alone.
Linda knew they were going to have to do something to deal with this. What she came up with would change Grace’s life. From birth onward
Doctors whisked Grace from her parents the minute she was born to run tests on her. About four hours later a genetic counselor came to their hospital room to give them the news: Grace had Down syndrome, a genetic condition that impairs cognitive development and can cause a range of health issues. She would face a lifetime of challenges, the counselor warned them.Linda and Jeff Strobel, who had not yet even held their baby girl, listened in shock while she told them their daughter would never read or write.
Grace Strobel gets a hug from her sister Laine Strobel at a family afternoon breakfast on at their Wildwood home on Sunday March 10, 2019. Laine was home from college visiting for spring break. Photo by Christian Gooden, Photos by Christian Gooden • cgooden@post-dispatch.com
“There is no shame in this at all,” Jeff remembers her saying, “there are still institutions that will take her. Just take your time to think about it.”
They each remember that day 22 years ago in California vividly. It lighted a fire in Linda. They would show this counselor and anyone else who thought their child wasn’t capable.
They named her Grace Elizabeth.
Linda started working with her the minute they got home. She put her on her belly to help her build muscle tone in her neck. She read everything she could on how to stimulate brain development in babies. They embarked on a lifelong journey in which she became her daughter’s teacher, coach and cheerleader. Quote
“When I look at Grace, I see courage and beauty.”
Ola Hawatmeh, St. Louis fashion designer
Jeff, a Navy veteran, appreciated the intensity of his wife’s training and joined in however he could. They set up an incline board, covered it with carpet and used her sippy cup as motivation to get Grace to crawl up it. They built obstacle courses in their living room to help her crawl, then walk. Linda focused on more than her baby’s gross motor skills, she researched ways to boost her nervous system and neurodevelopment.
They moved to Wildwood shortly after their second daughter, Laine, was born.
Linda ratcheted up the academic home schooling she did with Grace. By age 3, they would spend four to five hours daily on schoolwork — flashcards, short, small exercises.
Grace started reading when she was 5 and had memorized a thousand words.
When she was about 8 years old, Linda decided it would be good for her to attend elementary school for half a day to work on social skills with other students. She discovered that a diet without sugar, gluten and dairy and wheat helped Grace with her digestive and sensory issues.
“I was on a mission,” Linda said. “I didn’t care what other people said or did. I surrounded myself with like-minded people.”
Several times that meant taking Grace out of a school that wasn’t challenging her and putting her in a different private school. One teacher had Grace coloring worksheets all day. Finally, Linda couldn’t take it anymore.
“You’re going to end up getting a Ph.D. in coloring by the end of this,” she said to Grace. They transferred schools. And the rigorous schooling continued each day at home.
Grace sat next to her mom on the sofa in their home while Linda described the years of training and work they’ve done together. She looked at her blond-haired, smiling daughter and said, “After all that, you still like me?”
“Oh yes, I do,” Grace said, and slipped her arm through her mom’s.
The speech
Even Linda cried when they got home from the cafeteria where the children had laughed at her daughter in the spring of 2017. She held Grace and explained that sometimes people are afraid of what they don’t understand. Maybe Grace could help them understand.She had made presentations before. Maybe she could make one about Down syndrome. Grace was all in. This was a project they could tackle together.
Grace Strobel, (left), works out with her mother, Linda Strobel on Thursday, March 7, 2019, at the Jewish Community Center in Chesterfield. Grace, of Wildwood, is breaking barriers as a cover model with Down syndrome. Keeping fit is a big part of her career. Photo by Christian Gooden, Christian Gooden
She started researching common questions. How did she get Down syndrome? Could anyone “catch it” from her? What did it feel like to live with it? They spent months going through research, with stacks of paper spread out over the dining room table and the living room floor.
Linda reached out to Karen Hedrick, the principal at Rockwood Valley Middle School, which Grace had attended. Would they let her present it in front of the students there?
Hedrick realized how valuable it would be for the sixth-graders, who have two classmates with Down syndrome. They set a date for October, National Disabilities Awareness Month.
Grace amped up her preparation. Her parents hired a speech coach. She came to the school weekly to practice using the technology she would need for her PowerPoint and rehearse. She would bring stuffed animals to sit in the audience, so she could practice making eye contact while she talked. On Sundays, they would go to her father’s office where they could use a conference room to run through the talk.
Grace Strobel presenting at school. Photos courtesy of Linda Strobel
Hundreds of hours of practice later, it was the big day. More than 120 students filed into the library to watch her hourlong presentation. Immediately they noticed that her speech pattern was different and a little harder for them to follow. Bewildered, some of them looked at their teachers. The teachers nodded back and told them to focus.
Within five minutes, they settled in, their ears adjusted, and they hung on to every word.
Grace told them how doctors had said she would never be able to tie her own shoes when she was born. Her presentation has 72 slides. In one part of her talk, she has them put on bulky gloves and try to button a shirt to demonstrate what it feels like for her. She has them try on a weighted backpack to feel what it’s like to walk around with low muscle tone. By the end of the presentation, the students crowded around her, giving high-fives and hugs. The teachers had tears in their eyes.
“Twenty-three years as an educator, this is absolutely one of the highlights of my career,” Hedrick said.
Grace Strobel presenting at school. Photos courtesy of Linda Strobel
The two sixth-grade boys with Down syndrome watched from the audience. Going viral
After the success of the talk at Rockwood Valley, Grace started booking talks at other schools. She was asked to be the keynote speaker at a Funding Futures event in Chicago, which raises money for cognition research for people with Down syndrome. She and her parents edited her 45-minute prepared talk down to five powerful minutes. The night of the event, they had been traveling. Grace was tired and worn out and had barely eaten lunch. The room was noisy. Her parents held their breath as she walked to the front of the room.
“I was saying prayers like you can’t believe,” her father said.
With the microphone in front of her, Grace told the story about how doctors told her parents when she was born that she wouldn’t achieve much in her life.
“I’m here to tell you they were wrong,” she proclaimed.
The nonprofit raised a record amount of money that night.
Linda has had to limit Grace’s presentations to about once or twice a month because each one takes so much prep and mental and emotional work. But in the process of doing their research, Grace spotted a story about a model with Down syndrome. She asked her mother if that was possible for her.
Anything is possible, her mom said.
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis
Last summer, she hired a photographer to take modeling photos. Grace comes alive in front of the camera. When Linda posted the images of Grace on Facebook, the photos went viral. People from around the world sent encouraging messages. Her sister, Laine, was so blown away by how the pictures from one of Grace’s photo shoots turned out, she kept them on her phone, posted them on her Instagram and showed anyone who walked by her at college.
“Look at my sister,” she said.
A friend gave Linda the contact information for Ola Hawatmeh, a St. Louis fashion designer.
“My daughter has a dream to become a model,” Linda wrote to her, explaining her circumstances.
“I’m going to make her dream come true,” Hawatmeh said. She gave her some runway lessons on how to walk. She gave her homework to practice. She designed a dress to fit Grace’s 4-foot-11, petite frame. Designers are not allowed to bring their own models for Fashion Week shows in Atlantic City, so she reached out to the organizers to get special permission.
Grace strutted out as the finale in the show in a long, white dress.
The audience erupted in the loudest applause of the show.
Hawatmeh has invited her to walk in her next show in the fall during New York City’s Fashion Week.
“When I look at Grace, I see courage and beauty,” she said.
Grace has been featured on the cover of Chesterfield Lifestyle Magazine. Other magazines have run inside editorial spreads about her. The local high school newspaper did a story on her. She’s been interviewed by several local TV stations. She continues to work with her occupational therapist to learn how to shop for groceries and cook for herself with the dream of living independently one day.
Her father says he wishes he could buy the genetic counselor they met when she was born a plane ticket to NYC to watch Grace walk the runway.
When she’s not practicing her walk or her talk, Grace still volunteers in a preschool and kindergarten classroom. Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel hanging out with her younger sister, Laine Strobel. Photo courtesy of Laine Strobel. Woman with Down syndrome breaks barriers as model
Grace Strobel gets a hug from her sister Laine Strobel at a family afternoon breakfast on at their Wildwood home on Sunday March 10, 2019. Laine was home from college visiting for spring break. Photo by Christian Gooden, Photos by Christian Gooden • cgooden@post-dispatch.com Woman with Down syndrome breaks barriers as model
Grace Strobel leads the recession with the Rev. Richard Stoltz after Mass on Sunday, March 10, 2019, at St. Alban Roe Catholic Church in Wildwood. Photo by Christian Gooden, Christian Gooden
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Modeling Photos by Trenna Travis Woman with Down syndrome breaks barriers as model
Grace Strobel, (center), goes over the symptoms of scurvy with her mother, Linda on Sunday, March 10, 2019, as she does homework at their Wildwood home. Photo by Christian Gooden, Christian Gooden • cgooden@post-dispatch.com Woman with Down syndrome breaks barriers as model
Grace Strobel jogs around the running track on Thursday, March 7, 2019, during a workout at the Jewish Community Center in Chesterfield. Grace, of Wildwood, is breaking barriers as a cover model with Down syndrome. Keeping fit is a big part of her career. Photo by Christian Gooden, Christian Gooden Woman with Down syndrome breaks barriers as model
Grace Strobel works out on the pull-down machine on Thursday, March 7, 2019, at the Jewish Community Center in Chesterfield. Grace, of Wildwood, is breaking barriers as a cover model with Down syndrome. Keeping fit is a big part of her career. Photo by Christian Gooden, Christian Gooden
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel presenting at school. Photos courtesy of Linda Strobel Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Woman with Down syndrome breaks barriers as model
Grace Strobel throws the heavy ropes as she works out on Thursday, March 7, 2019, at the Jewish Community Center in Chesterfield. Grace, of Wildwood, is breaking barriers as a cover model with Down syndrome. Keeping fit is a big part of her career. Photo by Christian Gooden, Christian Gooden Woman with Down syndrome breaks barriers as model
Grace Strobel, (left), takes a water break as her mother Linda Strobel continues around the running track on Thursday, March 7, 2019, during a workout at the Jewish Community Center in Chesterfield. Grace, of Wildwood, is breaking barriers as a cover model with Down syndrome. Keeping fit is a big part of her career. Photo by Christian Gooden, Christian Gooden Woman with Down syndrome breaks barriers as model
Grace Strobel, (left), works out with her mother, Linda Strobel on Thursday, March 7, 2019, at the Jewish Community Center in Chesterfield. Grace, of Wildwood, is breaking barriers as a cover model with Down syndrome. Keeping fit is a big part of her career. Photo by Christian Gooden, Christian Gooden
Grace Strobel presenting at school. Photos courtesy of Linda Strobel Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel presenting at school. Photos courtesy of Linda Strobel Grace Strobel
Grace Strobel’s modeling photos. Photos by: Trenna Travis Grace Strobel

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  1. Mel Sanges November 6, 2019

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