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I interviewed 100 of the world’s wealthiest people and learned 4 brilliant tricks

I interviewed 100 of the world’s wealthiest people and learned 4 brilliant tricks

Gene Landrum did something seemingly impossible when he founded Chuck E. Cheese’s. He created an entirely new business model by combining several different ideas into one chain: food, family, and amusement park-type entertainment. Food: Kids love pizza. Amusement park-type entertainment: Kids are fixated on video games, whack-a-mole, and air hockey. Combine pizza and amusement park entertainment, and you have occupied kids and happy parents. Why parents? Because they can sit at the table, take a breather, and eat while their kids are busy playing in the gaming area. The hybrid pizza chain/entertainment center concept was revolutionary, and it reversed old thinking that had kept dining and kids’ entertainment separate. What businesses can you combine to create something entirely new? 3 / 3. Take advantage of obsolescence Wikimedia Commons When machinery and other office equipment gets old, most companies see junk. What do they do with the junk? They donate it or toss it out. Ron Klein — who’s also the founder of the credit card magnetic strip — does not see junk: He sees opportunity. When Klein ran General Associates, Inc., a data communications company, he acquired large quantities of surplus Teletype equipment from the Western Union Company. Why did he buy worthless junk? Where others saw a relic, he saw beauty — and money — in obsolescence. Klein refurbished the old Teletype equipment and sold it to major communications companies. As a special service, GA converted many of the machines into special teleprinters for the hearing impaired with messages imprinted in Braille. He created an innovative use for what had been considered junk. What junk do you have lying around that can be converted into cash? 4 / AP Competition is the new collaboration. Why are there four gas stations on every main intersection? Would you rather start your restaurant on a dirt road or situate it alongside restaurant row in the best part of town? Some may see this type of competition as a bad thing, but businesses can often help each other. Ernesto Ancira, Jr., who owns a slew of auto dealerships throughout the San Antonio, Texas area, doesn’t think this way. This has been to the benefit of the industry, the community, and even for his own business, Ancira-Winton Chevrolet, Inc. When the economy went down, Ernesto joined with his competitors and the Texas Automobile Dealers Association to reverse the negative image of the auto industry in their area. They worked together on special deals for customers and other joint events and offers — and everyone benefited, primarily because they created a level of sustained trust between consumer and dealer. What can you do to partner with your competitors and improve the image of your industry? Now: Take some action! To make any wealth hack work, you must think it, feel it, and get off your butt and do it. Dr. Greg Reid is a world-renowned speaker, filmmaker, and entrepreneur. Published, coauthored, and featured in more than 50 books and five motion pictures, Reid is also the founder and CEO of the Secret Knock, an event and professional collaboration community focused on partnership, networking, and business development. Based on content from ” Wealth Made Easy ,” Copyright © 2019 by Dr. Greg Reid with Gary M. Krebs.

27 Proposed Laws Pushed: Nearly 300 School Districts May Go | Patch

politics & government Shared from Manasquan-Belmar, NJ 27 Proposed Laws Pushed: Nearly 300 NJ School Districts May Go It’s now possible: See the list of NJ school districts that could vanish, as well as the 27 proposed new laws that could change everything. By Tom Davis, Patch National Staff | May 17, 2019 9:20 am ET | Updated May 17, 2019 1:15 pm ET {{ replyButtonLabel }} Reply {{ replyCount }} Belmar Elementary School: District would be eliminated under new plan. (Google photo) Lawmakers say they have a plan to fix New Jersey’s fiscal crisis, restore the stability of the pension system and save tens of billions of dollars for taxpayers.
And, in the process, the 27-bill package would also wipe out nearly 300 school districts – or more. The bills also would create a pilot program testing the viability of countywide school districts (see list of school districts and below).
Senate President Steve Sweeney, Sens. Paul Sarlo and Steve Oroho and Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald have unveiled a package of “Path to Progress” bills designed to create real, sustainable tax relief, they say.
Sweeney said the bills are intended to provide stability to a state with the highest property taxes, the second-largest unfunded pension liability, the second-worst credit rating and the fifth-highest overall tax burden in the nation.
The bill package comes just after lawmakers killed a bill to legalize marijuana in New Jersey. Read more: NJ Marijuana Legalization Bill Is Dead: Voters Will Decide
“These reforms can have an historic impact that will produce an unprecedented amount of sustained savings,” Sweeney said. “They will help make New Jersey more affordable, especially for hard working middle class families.
Among the 27 bills are measures requiring the:
Creation of a hybrid pension plan for teachers and non-uniformed state, county and municipal employees. Merger of the School Employees Health Benefits Plan into the State Health Benefits Plan to be run by an expanded Plan Design Committee, and the shift of all public employees from Platinum-level healthcare plans to Gold plans with an actuarial value of no more than 80 percent upon the expiration of current contracts. Require county school superintendents to develop regionalization plans to merge all K-4, K-6 and K-8 districts into K-12 regional school systems. The plan would provide funding for regionalization studies, require all local school districts to coordinate both curriculum and schedules with the regional high schools to which they send students, and set up a pilot program permitting the establishment of countywide school districts. The legislation introduced on Thursday was developed by the Sweeney-backed Economic and Fiscal Policy Workgroup of economists, academics, government experts and legislators. The group was put together by Sweeney and it’s chaired by Sarlo.
“If we fail to act, property taxes will continue to go up, and pension, health benefits and debt service will continue to eat up every penny of state revenue growth over the next three years, crowding out our ability to make the investments we need to make to increase aid to growing school districts, expand preschool, fix NJ Transit, make college affordable and provide funding for social service programs that serve our most vulnerable citizens,” Sweeney said.
Here are the districts that would be eliminated under the proposed legislation:
ABSECON CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 ALEXANDRIA TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 ALLAMUCHY TWP, WARREN K-8 ALLENDALE BORO, BERGEN K-8 ALLOWAY TWP, SALEM K-8 ALPHA BORO, WARREN K-8 ALPINE BORO, BERGEN K-8 ANDOVER REG, SUSSEX K-8 ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS BORO, MONMOUTH K-6 AVALON BORO, CAPE MAY K-8 AVON BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 BARRINGTON BORO, CAMDEN K-8 BASS RIVER TWP, BURLINGTON K-6 BAY HEAD BORO, OCEAN K-8 BEACH HAVEN BORO, OCEAN K-6 BEDMINSTER TWP, SOMERSET K-8 BELLMAWR BORO, CAMDEN K-8 BELMAR BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 BERKELEY TWP, OCEAN K-6 BERLIN BORO, CAMDEN K-8 BERLIN TWP, CAMDEN K-8 BETHLEHEM TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 BEVERLY CITY, BURLINGTON K-8 BLAIRSTOWN TWP, WARREN K-6 BLOOMINGDALE BORO, PASSAIC K-8 BLOOMSBURY BORO, HUNTERDON K-8 BOONTON TWP, MORRIS K-8 BRADLEY BEACH BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 BRANCHBURG TWP, SOMERSET K-8 BRIELLE BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 BRIGANTINE CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 BROOKLAWN BORO, CAMDEN K-8 BYRAM TWP, SUSSEX K-8 CALIFON BORO, HUNTERDON K-8 CAPE MAY CITY, CAPE MAY K-6 CARLSTADT BORO, BERGEN K-8 CHESTER TWP, MORRIS K-8 CHESTERFIELD TWP, BURLINGTON K-6 CLEMENTON BORO, CAMDEN K-8 CLINTON TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 CLINTON-GLEN GARDNER, HUNTERDON K-8 CLOSTER BORO, BERGEN K-8 COLTS NECK TWP, MONMOUTH K-8 COMMERCIAL TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 CRANBURY TWP, MIDDLESEX K-8 DEAL BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 DEERFIELD TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 DELANCO TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 DELAWARE TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 DEMAREST BORO, BERGEN K-8 DENNIS TWP, CAPE MAY K-8 DENVILLE TWP, MORRIS K-8 DOWNE TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 EAGLESWOOD TWP, OCEAN K-6 EAST AMWELL TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 EAST GREENWICH TWP, GLOUCESTER K-6 EAST HANOVER TWP, MORRIS K-8 EAST NEWARK BORO, HUDSON K-8 EAST RUTHERFORD BORO, BERGEN K-8 EASTAMPTON TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 EATONTOWN BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 EDGEWATER BORO, BERGEN K-6 EDGEWATER PARK TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 EGG HARBOR CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 ELK TWP, GLOUCESTER K-6 ELSINBORO TWP, SALEM K-8 ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS BORO, BERGEN K-8 ESSEX FELLS BORO, ESSEX K-6 ESTELL MANOR CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 EVESHAM TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 FAIR HAVEN BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 FAIRFIELD TWP, ESSEX K-6 FAIRFIELD TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 FAIRVIEW BORO, BERGEN K-8 FARMINGDALE BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 FLEMINGTON-RARITAN REG, HUNTERDON K-8 FLORHAM PARK BORO, MORRIS K-8 FOLSOM BORO, ATLANTIC K-8 FRANKFORD TWP, SUSSEX K-8 FRANKLIN BORO, SUSSEX K-8 FRANKLIN LAKES BORO, BERGEN K-8 FRANKLIN TWP, GLOUCESTER K-6 FRANKLIN TWP, WARREN K-6 FRANKLIN TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 FREDON TWP, SUSSEX K-6 FREEHOLD BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 FREEHOLD TWP, MONMOUTH K-8 FRELINGHUYSEN TWP, WARREN K-6 FRENCHTOWN BORO, HUNTERDON K-8 GALLOWAY TWP, ATLANTIC K-8 GARWOOD BORO, UNION K-8 GIBBSBORO BORO, CAMDEN K-8 GLOUCESTER TWP, CAMDEN K-8 GREAT MEADOWS REGIONAL, WARREN K-8 GREEN BROOK TWP, SOMERSET K-8 GREEN TWP, SUSSEX K-8 GREENWICH TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 GREENWICH TWP, GLOUCESTER K-8 GREENWICH TWP, WARREN K-8 GUTTENBERG TOWN, HUDSON K-8 HAINESPORT TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 HALEDON BORO, PASSAIC K-8 HAMBURG BORO, SUSSEX K-8 HAMILTON TWP, ATLANTIC K-8 HAMPTON BORO, HUNTERDON K-8 HAMPTON TWP, SUSSEX K-6 HANOVER TWP, MORRIS K-8 HARDING TOWNSHIP, MORRIS K-8 HARDYSTON TWP, SUSSEX K-8 HARMONY TWP, WARREN K-8 HARRINGTON PARK BORO, BERGEN K-8 HARRISON TWP, GLOUCESTER K-6 HAWORTH BORO, BERGEN K-8 HIGH BRIDGE BORO, HUNTERDON K-8 HIGHLANDS BORO, MONMOUTH K-6 HILLSDALE BORO, BERGEN K-8 HO HO KUS BORO, BERGEN K-8 HOLLAND TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 HOPE TWP, WARREN K-8 HOPEWELL TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 HOWELL TWP, MONMOUTH K-8 ISLAND HEIGHTS BORO, OCEAN K-6 JAMESBURG BORO, MIDDLESEX K-8 KINGWOOD TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 KNOWLTON TWP, WARREN K-6 LAFAYETTE TWP, SUSSEX K-8 LAKEHURST BORO, OCEAN K-8 LAUREL SPRINGS BORO, CAMDEN K-6 LAVALLETTE BORO, OCEAN K-8 LAWNSIDE BORO, CAMDEN K-8 LAWRENCE TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 LEBANON BORO, HUNTERDON K-6 LEBANON TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 LINCOLN PARK BORO, MORRIS K-8 LINWOOD CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 LITTLE EGG HARBOR TWP, OCEAN K-6 LITTLE FALLS TWP, PASSAIC K-8 LITTLE FERRY BORO, BERGEN K-8 LITTLE SILVER BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 LOGAN TWP, GLOUCESTER K-8 LONG BEACH ISLAND, OCEAN K-6 LONG HILL TWP, MORRIS K-8 LOPATCONG TWP, WARREN K-8 LOWER ALLOWAYS CREEK, SALEM K-8 LOWER TWP, CAPE MAY K-6 LUMBERTON TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 MAGNOLIA BORO, CAMDEN K-8 MANALAPAN-ENGLISHTOWN REG, MONMOUTH K-8 MANNINGTON TWP, SALEM K-8 MANSFIELD TWP, BURLINGTON K-6 MANSFIELD TWP, WARREN K-6 MANTUA TWP, GLOUCESTER K-6 MARGATE CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 MARLBORO TWP, MONMOUTH K-8 MAURICE RIVER TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 MAYWOOD BORO, BERGEN K-8 MEDFORD LAKES BORO, BURLINGTON K-8 MEDFORD TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 MENDHAM BORO, MORRIS K-8 MENDHAM TWP, MORRIS K-8 MERCHANTVILLE BORO, CAMDEN K-8 MILFORD BORO, HUNTERDON K-8 MILLSTONE TWP, MONMOUTH K-8 MILLTOWN BORO, MIDDLESEX K-8 MINE HILL TWP, MORRIS K-6 MONMOUTH BEACH BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 MONTAGUE TWP, SUSSEX K-8 MONTVALE BORO, BERGEN K-8 MOONACHIE BORO, BERGEN K-8 MORRIS PLAINS BORO, MORRIS K-8 MOUNT ARLINGTON BORO, MORRIS K-8 MOUNT HOLLY TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 MOUNT LAUREL TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 MOUNTAINSIDE BORO, UNION K-8 MOUNT EPHRAIM, K-8 MULLICA TWP, ATLANTIC K-8 NATIONAL PARK BORO, GLOUCESTER K-6 NEPTUNE CITY, MONMOUTH K-8 NETCONG BORO, MORRIS K-8 NEW HANOVER TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 NORTH CALDWELL BORO, ESSEX K-6 NORTH HALEDON BORO, PASSAIC K-8 NORTH HANOVER TWP, BURLINGTON K-6 NORTH WILDWOOD CITY, CAPE MAY K-8 NORTHFIELD CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 NORTHVALE BORO, BERGEN K-8 NORWOOD BORO, BERGEN K-8 OAKLAND BORO, BERGEN K-8 OAKLYN BORO, K-9 OCEAN GATE BORO, OCEAN K-6 OCEAN TWP, OCEAN K-6 OCEANPORT BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 OGDENSBURG BORO, SUSSEX K-8 OLD TAPPAN BORO, BERGEN K-8 OLDMANS TWP, SALEM K-8 ORADELL BORO, BERGEN K-6 OXFORD TWP, WARREN K-8 POHATCONG TWP, WARREN K-8 PORT REPUBLIC CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 PROSPECT PARK BORO, PASSAIC K-8 QUINTON TWP, SALEM K-8 READINGTON TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 RED BANK BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 RINGWOOD BORO, PASSAIC K-8 RIVER EDGE BORO, BERGEN K-6 RIVER VALE TWP, BERGEN K-8 RIVERDALE BORO, MORRIS K-8 RIVERTON, BURLINGTON K-8 ROCHELLE PARK TWP, BERGEN K-8 ROCKAWAY BORO, MORRIS K-8 ROCKAWAY TWP, MORRIS K-8 ROOSEVELT BORO, MONMOUTH K-6 ROSELAND BORO, ESSEX K-6 RUMSON BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 RUNNEMEDE BORO, CAMDEN K-8 SADDLE RIVER BORO, BERGEN K-6 SANDYSTON-WALPACK TWP, SUSSEX K-6 SEA GIRT BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 SEASIDE HEIGHTS BORO, OCEAN K-6 SHAMONG TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 SHREWSBURY BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 SOMERDALE BORO, CAMDEN K-8 SOMERS POINT CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 SOUTH BOUND BROOK, SOMERSET K-8 SOUTH HACKENSACK TWP, BERGEN K-8 SOUTH HARRISON TWP, GLOUCESTER K-6 SOUTHAMPTON TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 SPRING LAKE BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 SPRING LAKE HEIGHTS BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 SPRINGFIELD TWP, BURLINGTON K-6 STAFFORD TWP, OCEAN K-6 STANHOPE BORO, SUSSEX K-8 STILLWATER TWP, SUSSEX K-6 STONE HARBOR BORO, CAPE MAY K-4 STOW CREEK TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 STRATFORD BORO, CAMDEN K-8 SUSSEX-WANTAGE REGIONAL, SUSSEX K-8 SWEDESBORO-WOOLWICH, GLOUCESTER K-6 TABERNACLE TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 TEWKSBURY TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 TINTON FALLS, MONMOUTH K-8 TOTOWA BORO, PASSAIC K-8 TUCKERTON BORO, OCEAN K-6 UNION BEACH, MONMOUTH K-8 UNION TWP, HUNTERDON K-8 UPPER DEERFIELD TWP, CUMBERLAND K-8 UPPER PITTSGROVE TWP, SALEM K-8 UPPER SADDLE RIVER BORO, BERGEN K-8 UPPER TWP, CAPE MAY K-8 VENTNOR CITY, ATLANTIC K-8 VOORHEES TWP, CAMDEN K-8 WANAQUE BORO, PASSAIC K-8 WARREN TWP, SOMERSET K-8 WASHINGTON BORO, WARREN K-6 WASHINGTON TWP, WARREN K-6 WASHINGTON TWP, MORRIS K-8 WATCHUNG BORO, SOMERSET K-8 WATERFORD TWP, CAMDEN K-6 WENONAH BORO, GLOUCESTER K-6 WEST CAPE MAY BORO, CAPE MAY K-6 WEST LONG BRANCH BORO, MONMOUTH K-8 WESTAMPTON, BURLINGTON K-8 WESTVILLE BORO, GLOUCESTER K-6 WEYMOUTH TWP, ATLANTIC K-8 WHARTON BORO, MORRIS K-8 WHITE TWP, WARREN K-8 WILDWOOD CREST BORO, CAPE MAY K-8 WINFIELD TWP, UNION K-8 WOODBINE BORO, CAPE MAY K-8 WOODBURY HEIGHTS BORO, GLOUCESTER K-6 WOODCLIFF LAKE BORO, BERGEN K-8 WOODLAND PARK, PASSAIC K-8 WOODLAND TWP, BURLINGTON K-8 WOODLYNNE BORO, CAMDEN K-8 WYCKOFF TWP, BERGEN K-8 Here are the 27 bills:
S.3753 Establishes cash balance plans in PERS and TPAF for new public employees and employees with less than five years of service; makes various changes to PERS and TPAF retirement eligibility. This bill would make the following changes for new employees and employees with less than five years of service: 1) increases the age of retirement to 67 years old; 2) moves these employees into a hybrid pension plan in which employees have a defined benefit pension on the first $40,000 of salary and a cash balance plan that provides an interest credit of 75 percent of the State’s rate of return or a minimum return of 4 percent, whichever is greater; 3) details the distribution of funds when the employee retires or terminates employment after less than 10 years; and 4) requires no employer contribution to the employees cash balance plan. S.3754 Terminates SEHBP; terminates SHBP Plan Design Committee; transfers coverage from SEHBP to SHBP; requires certain plans with no employee or retiree contribution; imposes limit on health care benefits for public employees. This bill would terminate the SEHBP as of Jan. 1, 2020, and shift employees to SHBP. The bill would also dissolve the State Health Benefits Plan Design Committee and move the responsibilities to the State Health Benefits Committee. The bill would add new members to the Committee. Health plans offered would not be able to exceed an actuarial value of 80 percent. No plan offered by a public employer could provide greater benefits than the highest level provided under the SHBP. The bill would permit a local public entity and bargaining unit to renegotiate a collective bargain agreement to account for these modifications, S.2455/A.2001 Transfers county college employees and retirees from membership in SEHBP to membership in SHBP. This bill would transfer New Jersey county college employees and retirees from membership in the SEHBP to membership in the SHBP. S.2578/A.1851 Limits payments for unused sick leave earned after effective date by public officers or employees represented by union; for all public employees, limits vacation leave carry-forward and requires suspension and forfeiture of certain supplemental compensation. (Sweeney/Weinberg). The bill would cap payments for unused sick leave at $7,500 and would grandfather sick leave earned prior to the effective date. Under the bill, if accumulated unused sick leave earned prior to the effective date is $7,500 or more at the time of retirement, accumulated unused sick leave earned after the effective date will have no monetary value. S.3042/A.4619 Creates subaccounts for SHBP and SEHBP health care services and prescription drug claims; requires procurement by State of third-party medical claims reviewer. (Sarlo/Oroho). This bill would create subaccounts in the SHBP Fund and the SEHBP Fund. The bill would also require the State to procure a professional services contract for a third-party medical claims reviewer for SHBP and SEHBP. The third party medical claims reviewer will provide real-time or near-real-time review and oversight of the medical claims payment processing, and will maintain a secure archive of medical claims and other health services payment data. S.103 Limits eligibility of certain public employees for health care benefits; prohibits those so limited from receiving payments for waiving benefits. (Weinberg/Kean). This bill limits a public employee of the state, a local government, or a local board of education, or agency or authority thereof, to receiving health care benefits coverage from only one public employer of this State if the employee holds more than one public position simultaneously. The bill prohibits a public employee so limited from continuing to receive any payment from the employee’s public employer for waiving the health care benefits coverage provided by the employer and from waiving any coverage and receiving payment in the future. S.3755 Requires executive county superintendent of schools to establish consolidation plan to combine all school districts in county, other than preschool or kindergarten through grade 12 districts, into all-purpose regional schools districts. The bill would require the consolidation of all school districts, other than PreK or kindergarten through grade 12 districts, into all-purpose regional school districts. Within the first 3 months, districts would develop their own consolidation plans. Any districts without a plan would have a plan developed for them by the executive county superintendent. All costs of the studies would be borne by the State. The study should take into account the feasibility of consolidation and any consequences of consolidation. Districts would then have 2 years to consolidate if approved by the commissioner, or 3 years if the commissioner does not and creates their own plan. S.3756 Requires limited purpose regional school districts to coordinate with constituent districts regarding school calendar and curriculum. This bill would require the board of education of a limited purpose regional school district to meet and work with constituent schools districts of the regional district to coordinate school calendars and ensure consistency in curriculum. This would be required to take place at least once a year. S.3757 Establishes a pilot program in DOE for organization of county administrative school districts. This bill would establish a pilot program for the organization of at most 5 county administrative school districts. The pilot program would be ongoing for 9 years. After 9 years, the commissioner would prepare a report for the Legislature and Governor with recommendations of the program. S.3758 Provides for direct State payment of cost of special education and related services for certain students. This bill would create in but not of the Department of Education, the Office of High Needs Placement Funding. This office, along with the High Needs Placement Committee, would assume all extraordinary special education costs over $55,000. The State would assume the costs of each student above the $55,000 threshold. Extraordinary Special Education Aid would be eliminated within 2 years of the establishment of direct State funding. The Committee would also be charged with reviewing the program and providers. S.3219 Eliminates use of census-based funding of special education aid in school funding law. (Singer/Diegnan). This bill eliminates the use of the census-based methodology, and calculates State aid for special education based on the actual number of special education students included in the district’s resident enrollment. S.3759 Creates special education unit within the Office of Administrative Law. This bill would establish a unit within the Office of Administrative Law dedicated to special education cases. The administrative law judges within this unit would have expertise in special education law. The bill would allow time for the OAL to develop a timeline to hire, train, and assign judges as needed to this unit. The bill would also require a report on the adherence to the 45 day adjudication schedule and any other recommendations for improvements to the Legislature and Governor. S.3760 Requires municipalities, school districts, and local authorities to regularly meet to discuss shared service agreements. The bill would require the governing body of a municipality, the board of education of each district, and the governing body of each local authority to hold a public meeting at least twice a year to evaluate shared service agreements and discuss entering into new agreements. Any municipality that violates the requirements of the bill would incur a five percent reduction in formula aid. S.3761 Establishes County and Municipal Study Commission. This bill would establish the County and Municipal Study Commission as a permanent commission in the Legislative Branch of State Government. The commission would be charged with studying county and municipal government holistically and with a long-term perspective in order to identify opportunities to deliver local government services in a more modern and efficient manner and reflects the changes to the fiscal circumstances of the State and local government, development patterns, technology, and expectations for local government services. The Commission would make regular recommendations to the Legislature. S.3762 Concerns assessment of real property. This bill would permit any county to adopt the provisions of the “Property Tax Assessment Reform Act,” which provides for county-based real property assessment. The bill would also require that the true value of real property be determined by the municipal-wide reassessment of that real property performed by municipal assessors when the ratio of assessed value to true value is lower than 90 percent or greater than 110 percent. S.1 Encourages sharing of services; makes appropriations. (Sweeney/Gopal). This bill modifies the “Uniform Shared Services and Consolidation Act,” sections 1 through 35, and the law governing the Local Unit Alignment, Reorganization and Consolidation Commission (LUARCC), to encourage and facilitate the provision of local and regional services through shared service agreements and joint contracts. Some modifications include civil service relief for shared service agreements. S.3763 Renames joint meetings as regional service agencies; grandfathers existing joint meetings. This bill would amend the “Uniform Shared Services and Consolidation Act” and other laws that refer to “joint meetings” to “regional service agencies.” Joint meetings created prior to the enactment of the bill would be grandfathered. S.3764 Requires counties to appoint shared service coordinators; appropriates $2 million to fund these appointments. This bill would require each county to appoint a county shared service coordinator who would be responsible for promoting and facilitating shared service agreements between local governments in the coordinator’s county, including the county itself. The bill would provide State grants to offset total compensation by up to $95,000. An appropriation of $2 million is included for this purpose. S.3765 Establishes Office of Local Government Efficiency in DCA; appropriates $250,000 for program support. This bill would establish the Office of Local Government Efficiency in DCA. The office would be charged with working to promote and facilitate the regionalization and innovative delivery of local government services with the aim of lowering property taxes. Under the bill, Rutgers would be charged with providing training courses on delivery local government services through shared service agreements, joint contracts, and alternative service delivery methods. S.3766 Requires Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy to undertake study to determine efficiency and scaling in delivery of local government services. The bill would direct the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy to conduct a study for scaling for the most efficient delivery of services by local units within the context of shared services agreements, joint contracts, and alternative service delivery methods. The study would examine the following, including, but not limited to: 1) municipal courts; 2) construction code enforcement; 3) fire code enforcement; 4) municipal and county health services; 5) property tax assessments; 6) public works; and 7) provisions of emergency services. S.3767 Establishes pilot program to permit use of generally accepted accounting principles in certain county and municipal annual financial statements. Under the bill, the governing body of a pilot county or pilot municipality may apply to the Director of the Division of Local Government Services in the Department of Community Affairs to participate in the pilot program to use the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). The pilot program would operate for approximately three years. Within six months after each participating county and municipality has submitted its third annual financial statement using the GAAP standards, the division would be required to submit a report to the Legislature concerning the pilot program. S.1701/A.345 Requires cost-benefit analyses for long term tax exemption; requires DCA to create database of these exemptions; requires new distribution of annual service charges; requires five-year tax exemption and abatements be filed with certain county officials. (Singleton/Sweeney/Stack). This bill would require an application for a long term property tax exemption to include a cost-benefit analysis and for the mayor or other chief executive officer of the municipality to produce an independent cost-benefit analysis to be submitted along with the application to the municipal governing body before it can decide on the exemption. The bill would require municipalities to consider and evaluate whether an investment in a redevelopment project through the grant of a long term property tax exemption will generate satisfactory revenue returns to the municipality, as well as the financial impacts to counties, school districts, and other local governments. Finally, The bill would require each municipality which enters into a financial agreement on or after the effective date of the bill to remit a portion of the annual service charge collected by the municipality to the county, school district, and any other taxing district, within which a redevelopment relocation housing project is located, in direct proportion to the distribution of the amount raised by taxation in the municipality in the prior tax year. S.3768 Requires shared service agreements to include certain provisions. The bill would require that share service agreements between local governments include the following provisions in addition to requirements under current law: 1) performance evaluation criteria; 2) procedures for determining any fee adjustments; 3) alternative dispute resolution procedures; and 4) exit procedures to govern the dissolution of the agreement. S.3769 Permits county police department and force to provide police services to municipalities. This bill would authorize a county police department and force to enter into a shared service agreement pursuant to the “Uniform Shared Services and Consolidation Act” with any municipality located in the county to provide any, or all, police services to the municipality that a municipal police department and force is authorized to perform itself. S.3246/A.4807 Establishes elective pass-through business alternative income tax and allows refundable gross income tax credit for taxpayers earning income from pass-through businesses in taxable year. (Sarlo/Singleton/Oroho). This bill would create an optional entity-level tax on pass-through businesses. For a business that opts to pay the pass-through tax in a tax year, the bill would provide a refundable gross income tax credit that is available to taxpayers who are members of the pass-through business, irrespective of whether the taxpayer is a natural person, business entity, or estate or trust. This would allow these businesses to take advantage of federal tax deductions that were recently capped for individuals. The bill would also contribute to correcting the existing imbalance between the Property Tax Relief Fund and General Fund. S.3770 Establishes “New Jersey Economic and Fiscal Policy Review Commission” to provide ongoing review of State and local tax structure, economic conditions, and related fiscal issues. The bill would establish a 12-member “New Jersey Economic and Fiscal Policy Review Commission” in the Legislative branch. The commission would be charged with studying significant economic and fiscal concerns confronting the State to assure that policymakers, academics, and the public are provided with information and analyses of the State’s policies and their implications. S.2179/A.307 Allows gross income tax deduction for charitable contributions to certain New Jersey-based charitable organizations. (Kean/Singleton). The bill allows a New Jersey gross income taxpayer to deduct from gross income the contributions made by the taxpayer during the taxable year to a qualified New Jersey-based charitable organization. The bill provides that the amount of the deduction is limited to the amount allowable as a deduction from federal adjusted gross income by the taxpayer for the federal taxable year pursuant to section 170 of the federal Internal Revenue Code. Subscribe Back to the Livingston Patch More from Livingston Up next on Livingston Patch Saint Barnabas Hospital Aces Leapfrog ‘Safety Grade’ Yet Again 21h Livingston Releases 2019 Water Quality Report 1d The Neck Hammock Is Here To Relieve Your Aches And Pains 3h Read more local news from Livingston
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Why Kids Shouldn’t Be Forced To Share |

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.
kids & family Shared from Rivertowns, NY Why Kids Shouldn’t Be Forced To Share When a dad in the park told his kid not to share with my son, I wondered if I was missing something. Turns out, I was. By Ilana Donna Arazie, Patch Contributing Writer | May 17, 2019 1:35 pm ET {{ replyButtonLabel }} Reply {{ replyCount }} (Shutterstock) Last year, I was at the playground when my (then) almost 2-year-old spotted another kid holding two shiny, big trucks. He went over to him, crying and asking — then begging — to play with either one. The dad standing by the child told him “It’s okay, son, you don’t have to share.” The boy was actually pretty indifferent and would have been fine sharing the truck with my son, but it was the dad who squashed the whole deal.
I was a bit shocked. “The nerve of this dad,” I thought. As my kid started crying even more, I carried him away while whispering some not-so-nice things in my head. The dad’s response confused me. Was he just not a nice guy or did he know something about sharing that I didn’t get— or maybe a combination of both?
A few months later, we arrived in preschool and the topic of sharing came up. Of course, no child was sharing the toys they were playing with too easily.
According to a piece on famlii.com called, ” Mine! Why Your Two Year Old Can’t Share ,” here’s why toddlers don’t like to share:
They define themselves by their possessions. Their timing is off and think the item will be gone forever. They can’t understand how others feel, let alone how they feel! Then there was my child, who at the time wasn’t putting up too much of a fight when kids wanted the trains or animals he was playing with.
In his case, the teachers were actually telling him to not give up his toys too and to not share if he didn’t feel like it. They were actually trying to protect him from getting bullied or pushed around. Were they on the same parenting page of some philosophy that the dad in the park was on?
I checked in with my son’s teacher in his 3-year-old class this year and she explained, “Children do share and are encouraged to share. And teachers model sharing all the time in the classroom. BUT they are not forced to share. When they are ‘ready’ they will share on their own.”
Here is why, she explained, kids shouldn’t be forced to share:
No one shares everything. Adults don’t share everything. Children are living in this same world. Children need to know they have a voice in their decision-making. Children should not be interrupted or forced to give up what they are working with, because the child might be mastering a skill. Children need to learn what to do with their feelings when they are disappointed or things don’t go their way. Children need to learn respect when another child makes a decision they don’t like and they don’t get their way. When a child is ready , they will share naturally! That makes a lot of sense to me, and I can now see why we don’t always need to force our kids to share. Do I think that dad could have been nicer about it? Sure. But hey, maybe he was having a bad day. When my kid wants a toy that another kid is using, I tell him that he can play with it as soon as that kid is done.
All of this teaches our children to learn how to wait, which still is a hard lesson for us in this house! (Yes, toddler and mom included.) Either way, sharing will eventually get easier and until then, you won’t see me bringing any large, shiny cars to the park.
Subscribe Back to the Marietta Patch The views expressed in this post are the author’s own. Want to post on Patch? Register for a user account. More from Marietta Up next on Marietta Patch Tough Marietta Cop Shows Big Heart | Cobb’s Top News Of The Week 13h Austell Child Molester Gets 40-Year Jail Sentence 13h 14 Must-Haves For Memorial Day Weekend And Beyond 10h Read more local news from Marietta
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Why Kids Shouldn’t Be Forced To Share |

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.
kids & family Shared from Rivertowns, NY Why Kids Shouldn’t Be Forced To Share When a dad in the park told his kid not to share with my son, I wondered if I was missing something. Turns out, I was. By Ilana Donna Arazie, Patch Contributing Writer | May 17, 2019 1:35 pm (Shutterstock) Last year, I was at the playground when my (then) almost 2-year-old spotted another kid holding two shiny, big trucks. He went over to him, crying and asking — then begging — to play with either one. The dad standing by the child told him “It’s okay, son, you don’t have to share.” The boy was actually pretty indifferent and would have been fine sharing the truck with my son, but it was the dad who squashed the whole deal.
I was a bit shocked. “The nerve of this dad,” I thought. As my kid started crying even more, I carried him away while whispering some not-so-nice things in my head. The dad’s response confused me. Was he just not a nice guy or did he know something about sharing that I didn’t get— or maybe a combination of both?
A few months later, we arrived in preschool and the topic of sharing came up. Of course, no child was sharing the toys they were playing with too easily.
According to a piece on famlii.com called, ” Mine! Why Your Two Year Old Can’t Share ,” here’s why toddlers don’t like to share:
They define themselves by their possessions. Their timing is off and think the item will be gone forever. They can’t understand how others feel, let alone how they feel! Then there was my child, who at the time wasn’t putting up too much of a fight when kids wanted the trains or animals he was playing with.
In his case, the teachers were actually telling him to not give up his toys too and to not share if he didn’t feel like it. They were actually trying to protect him from getting bullied or pushed around. Were they on the same parenting page of some philosophy that the dad in the park was on?
I checked in with my son’s teacher in his 3-year-old class this year and she explained, “Children do share and are encouraged to share. And teachers model sharing all the time in the classroom. BUT they are not forced to share. When they are ‘ready’ they will share on their own.”
Here is why, she explained, kids shouldn’t be forced to share:
No one shares everything. Adults don’t share everything. Children are living in this same world. Children need to know they have a voice in their decision-making. Children should not be interrupted or forced to give up what they are working with, because the child might be mastering a skill. Children need to learn what to do with their feelings when they are disappointed or things don’t go their way. Children need to learn respect when another child makes a decision they don’t like and they don’t get their way. When a child is ready , they will share naturally! That makes a lot of sense to me, and I can now see why we don’t always need to force our kids to share. Do I think that dad could have been nicer about it? Sure. But hey, maybe he was having a bad day. When my kid wants a toy that another kid is using, I tell him that he can play with it as soon as that kid is done.
All of this teaches our children to learn how to wait, which still is a hard lesson for us in this house! (Yes, toddler and mom included.) Either way, sharing will eventually get easier and until then, you won’t see me bringing any large, shiny cars to the park.
Subscribe Back to the Hills Patch The views expressed in this post are the author’s own. Want to post on Patch? Register for a user account. More from Hills Up next on Hills Patch Hills Weekend Weather Forecast 1d Hills: 5 Open Houses Coming Up (PICS) 2d 14 Must-Haves For Memorial Day Weekend And Beyond 11h Read more local news from Hills
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I interviewed 100 of the world’s wealthiest people and learned 4 tricks that explain how the super-rich get to the top – and stay there

I interviewed 100 of the world’s wealthiest people and learned 4 tricks that explain how the super-rich get to the top – and stay there Dr. Greg Reid, Contributor May 17, 2019, 01:12 IST Dr. Greg Reid. Courtesy of Dr. Greg Reid Dr. Greg Reid interviewed 100 of the world’s richest people – from entertainment pioneers to real estate tycoons – to find out how they built their wealth and held onto it. He and co-author Gary M. Krebs published the findings in a book, ” Wealth Made Easy ,” which contains proven, real-world strategies for hanging onto money. For example, buy land in an area eight miles from a fast-growing town, rent it out to local farmers to cover the costs, and then sell it to a large retail developer for much more than you paid. Another strategy: Combine unrelated business ideas for something brand new that meets the needs of a wide range of people. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.
Ever wonder how you can discover the insider secrets – or wealth hacks – that millionaires and billionaires used to build their lives of sustained prosperity?
If you don’t have access to super wealthy people, don’t sweat it. Below are four simple wealth hacks to get you started. {{}} View As: One Page Slides 1. Buy dirt
Canadian land mogul Brian Sidorsky shares a concept so powerful it challenges your imagination. When asked how he amassed a fortune in raw, undeveloped land, he sat back in his chair and exclaimed, “Time plus dirt is wealth.”
Sidorsky then clarified his concept. “Find a town anywhere in North America that is growing 20 to 25 percent a year. Pinpoint their ‘Main Street’ and draw a line out eight miles from that location and buy that land. That is the ‘dirt.’ Rent the soil to local farmers who will pay the rent that covers the costs, so it’s free. As the town continues to expand, eventually it ends up on your property where you own the largest lot and, since you are already near Main Street, you can then sell that land to a big-box store for one hundred times what you paid for it.” 2. Combine unrelated business ideas
Gene Landrum did something seemingly impossible when he founded Chuck E. Cheese’s. He created an entirely new business model by combining several different ideas into one chain: food, family, and amusement park-type entertainment.
Food: Kids love pizza. Amusement park-type entertainment: Kids are fixated on video games, whack-a-mole, and air hockey.
Combine pizza and amusement park entertainment, and you have occupied kids and happy parents. Why parents? Because they can sit at the table, take a breather, and eat while their kids are busy playing in the gaming area.
The hybrid pizza chain/entertainment center concept was revolutionary, and it reversed old thinking that had kept dining and kids’ entertainment separate.
What businesses can you combine to create something entirely new? 3. Take advantage of obsolescence
When machinery and other office equipment gets old, most companies see junk. What do they do with the junk? They donate it or toss it out.
Ron Klein — who’s also the founder of the credit card magnetic strip — does not see junk: He sees opportunity.
When Klein ran General Associates, Inc., a data communications company, he acquired large quantities of surplus Teletype equipment from the Western Union Company.
Why did he buy worthless junk? Where others saw a relic, he saw beauty — and money — in obsolescence. Klein refurbished the old Teletype equipment and sold it to major communications companies. As a special service, GA converted many of the machines into special teleprinters for the hearing impaired with messages imprinted in Braille.
He created an innovative use for what had been considered junk. What junk do you have lying around that can be converted into cash? 4. Go against the grain — work with your competitors
Competition is the new collaboration. Why are there four gas stations on every main intersection? Would you rather start your restaurant on a dirt road or situate it alongside restaurant row in the best part of town?
Some may see this type of competition as a bad thing, but businesses can often help each other. Ernesto Ancira, Jr., who owns a slew of auto dealerships throughout the San Antonio, Texas area, doesn’t think this way. This has been to the benefit of the industry, the community, and even for his own business, Ancira-Winton Chevrolet, Inc.
When the economy went down, Ernesto joined with his competitors and the Texas Automobile Dealers Association to reverse the negative image of the auto industry in their area. They worked together on special deals for customers and other joint events and offers — and everyone benefited, primarily because they created a level of sustained trust between consumer and dealer.
What can you do to partner with your competitors and improve the image of your industry?
Now: Take some action! To make any wealth hack work, you must think it, feel it, and get off your butt and do it.
Dr. Greg Reid is a world-renowned speaker, filmmaker, and entrepreneur. Published, coauthored, and featured in more than 50 books and five motion pictures, Reid is also the founder and CEO of the Secret Knock, an event and professional collaboration community focused on partnership, networking, and business development.
Based on content from ” Wealth Made Easy ,” Copyright © 2019 by Dr. Greg Reid with Gary M. Krebs.

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